#latergram

#latergram

Bar Harbor. #definebeauty

Bar Harbor. #definebeauty

xo

xo

A mural of Katsushika Hokusai’s Great Wave at Kanagawa in D.C.

A mural of Katsushika HokusaiGreat Wave at Kanagawa in D.C.

Anonymous said: Shelfie?

I have a few books going at once right now (and finally). Two are on my tablet so I’m breaking the format. :)

Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, by Daniel Mendelsohn.
The Power of Impact Investing, by Judith Rodin and Margot Brandenburg.
The Social Entrepreneur’s Playbook, by Ian C. MacMillan and Dr. James Thompson. 
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, by Susan Cain.
The Other Side of Paradise: Life in the New Cuba, by Julia Cooke.

Palermo. #definebeauty

Palermo. #definebeauty

“We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.” —Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

“We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.” —Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

When will this be irrelevant? I’m preoccupied with Isaac Cordal’s book, Small Interventions in the Big City.

When will this be irrelevant? I’m preoccupied with Isaac Cordal’s book, Small Interventions in the Big City.

(Source: cementeclipses)

“The time has come to realise that an interpretation of the universe — even a positivist one — remains unsatisfying unless it covers the interior as well as the exterior of things; mind as well as matter. The true physics is that which will, one day, achieve the inclusion of man in his wholeness in a coherent picture of the world.” 

—Excerpted from Pierre Teilhard de Chardin’s Le phénomène humain.

Golden Mean ratio in a marble metope from the Parthenon.

Golden Mean ratio in a marble metope from the Parthenon.

(Source: glebedigital)

Data torture throwback via Bloomberg Businessweek.

Data torture throwback via Bloomberg Businessweek.

Last night, I broke a personal Internet fast. I’ve spent the past three months using the Internet heavily for work—mostly research. Even while traveling, because I’m excited about this project. “Personal Internet fast” translates to sparse Tumblr posts, tweeting, and Facebook activity (Does anyone else find Facebook overwhelming? Post-news feed cleanup, it’s still too much), and the usual Instagram activity—lots, in sporadic bursts. When the day is finished, and I’ve digested the news and other articles of interest online, nothing feels as good (technologically) as a mental health break spent scrolling through photos of family, friends, and beautiful surf.
 Over the past year, I’ve amassed a significant quantity of books and periodicals that I would have normally spent reading while in transit during the week or weekend. Watching the stacks grow was pretty sad. I chose to “read” Twitter and skim articles saved to Pocket while in transit. I skimmed digital editions on my tablet while traveling and home. I chose this because it was simply easier to read, watch Twitter, and switch music playlists while on one device.
 Over the past three months, I made time to sit down with a few of these books*.
 I read David Carr’s latest column last night and felt his weariness. “It struck me that part of the reason we always stay jacked in is that we want everyone — at the other end of the phone, on Facebook and Twitter, on the web, on email — to know that we are part of the now. If we look away, we worry we will disappear,” he wrote. The digital world and social communities that we’ve created and continue to foster have in turn created beautiful and / or good things, but it feels wonderful to sit down with a book, a magazine, shut the smartphone off, and thoroughly inhale a story.
 *Books I read, and recommend:Eurasian: Mixed Identities in the United States, China, and Hong Kong, 1842–1943, by Emma Jinhua Teng.Mixed, a collection of essays written by multiracial college students.Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success, by Adam Grant.Contagious: Why Things Catch On, by Jonah Berger.Think Like a Freak, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner.Love and Math, by Edward Frenkel.Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina, by Misty Copeland.Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
 Most magazines are enjoyed in real time, but I did enjoy plucking the more seductive issues from a year’s worth of The Economist, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Wired, Vogue, GQ, Vanity Fair, Esquire, The Paris Review, and Lapham’s Quarterly. (The latest issue of Lapham’s, “Youth,” is a treasure. Do not skip around with this.) I skipped Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Forbes, and Harvard Business Review, as they no longer felt relevant, and I had previously read most of the issues online. I also skipped Monocle and Apartamento, which are coffee table material and I’ll inevitably spend time glancing through both.
 Photograph via @wblau. Last night, while checking out The Economist’s Tumblr, I noticed an interesting out-of-home advertisement featured prominently on their public display of “likes,” and found this. Clearly, I was supremely excited to be back on Tumblr.
 It’s good to be back on THE INTERNET.

Last night, I broke a personal Internet fast. I’ve spent the past three months using the Internet heavily for work—mostly research. Even while traveling, because I’m excited about this project. “Personal Internet fast” translates to sparse Tumblr posts, tweeting, and Facebook activity (Does anyone else find Facebook overwhelming? Post-news feed cleanup, it’s still too much), and the usual Instagram activity—lots, in sporadic bursts. When the day is finished, and I’ve digested the news and other articles of interest online, nothing feels as good (technologically) as a mental health break spent scrolling through photos of family, friends, and beautiful surf.


Over the past year, I’ve amassed a significant quantity of books and periodicals that I would have normally spent reading while in transit during the week or weekend. Watching the stacks grow was pretty sad. I chose to “read” Twitter and skim articles saved to Pocket while in transit. I skimmed digital editions on my tablet while traveling and home. I chose this because it was simply easier to read, watch Twitter, and switch music playlists while on one device.


Over the past three months, I made time to sit down with a few of these books*.


I read David Carr’s latest column last night and felt his weariness. “It struck me that part of the reason we always stay jacked in is that we want everyone — at the other end of the phone, on Facebook and Twitter, on the web, on email — to know that we are part of the now. If we look away, we worry we will disappear,” he wrote. The digital world and social communities that we’ve created and continue to foster have in turn created beautiful and / or good things, but it feels wonderful to sit down with a book, a magazine, shut the smartphone off, and thoroughly inhale a story.


*Books I read, and recommend:
Eurasian: Mixed Identities in the United States, China, and Hong Kong, 1842–1943, by Emma Jinhua Teng.
Mixed, a collection of essays written by multiracial college students.
Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success, by Adam Grant.
Contagious: Why Things Catch On, by Jonah Berger.
Think Like a Freak, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner.
Love and Math, by Edward Frenkel.
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina, by Misty Copeland.
Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.


Most magazines are enjoyed in real time, but I did enjoy plucking the more seductive issues from a year’s worth of The Economist, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Wired, Vogue, GQ, Vanity Fair, Esquire, The Paris Review, and Lapham’s Quarterly. (The latest issue of Lapham’s, “Youth,” is a treasure. Do not skip around with this.) I skipped Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Forbes, and Harvard Business Review, as they no longer felt relevant, and I had previously read most of the issues online. I also skipped Monocle and Apartamento, which are coffee table material and I’ll inevitably spend time glancing through both.


Photograph via @wblau. Last night, while checking out The Economist’s Tumblr, I noticed an interesting out-of-home advertisement featured prominently on their public display of “likes,” and found this. Clearly, I was supremely excited to be back on Tumblr.


It’s good to be back on THE INTERNET.